Criterion Release Trailer for Awesome Godzilla Collection Box Set

Godzilla_criterion_collection_spread_Yuko_Shimizu

The Criterion Collection, a boutique company which releases “important classic and contemporary” films to home video has just released the trailer for their forthcoming 1000th set:

Godzilla: The Showa Era Films, 1954 – 1975, will collect in one glorious-looking box, the first fifteen movies from Toho’s long-running kaiju eiga series:

Godzilla (1954), Godzilla Raids Again (1955), King Kong vs. Godzilla (1963), Mothra vs. Godzilla (1964), Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964), Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965), Ebirah, Horror of the Deep (1966), Son of Godzilla (1967), Destroy All Monsters (1968), All Monsters Attack (1969), Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971), Godzilla vs. Gigan (1972), Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973), Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974), and Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975).

The Criterion set is the first such collection released in the West, tracking Godzilla’s journey from the wrath of atomic power through to kooky world-saving hero, and also features Japanese and U.S. versions of both Godzilla and King Kong vs. Godzilla, audio commentaries, audio essays, new translations, new and archival interviews with the casts and crews and a deluxe hardcover book full of notes on the films and a slew of gorgeous new illustrations, along with much more.

If that trailer has your radioactive breath set to full blast, you’ll be pleased to know Criterion’s Godzilla box set will be released on October 29th.

Marvel Finds Its Kate Bishop For Hawkeye TV Show – Hailee Steinfeld!

hailee

Variety are reporting that Marvel are close to signing Hailee Steinfeld to play Kate Bishop, in their new Disney Plus limited series, Hawkeye.

Jeremy Renner will move across from the movies to play Hawkeye, and Steinfeld will play Kate Bishop, a character who took on the mantle of the Hawkeye name, while Clint Barton was off doing dark deeds as Ronin (as seen in Avengers: Endgame).

We’re big fans of Steinfeld, here at Out Of Dave’s Head Towers, from her breakthrough role in the Cohen Brothers’ 2010 remake of True Grit, through to her superb turns in films including The Edge of Seventeen and the Transformers film it’s okay to like, Bumblebee.

Since these series on Disney Plus will be more directly linked to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (unlike the ABC and Netflix shows, which drifted further away from the MCU over time), it will be intriguing to see whether Steinfeld as Bishop will eventually cross over into future films.

Hawkeye will string his bow on Disney Plus in autumn 2021.

Terrance Dicks 1935 – 2019

dicks 2

Terrance Dicks passed away today and I’m not even sure where to begin when it comes to talking about the importance of his work to me.

Dicks was the script editor on Doctor Who, from 1968 to 1974 (and a writer on the show for much longer), seeing the torch of the lead actor passed from Patrick Troughton to Jon Pertwee, and standing down with the arrival of Tom Baker (for whom he wrote the first story). Important years for the show and for this young mind, as this period saw me transformed from an avid, regular viewer into a full-blown fan.

But his work weaved an even greater magic, as he would become the most prolific writer of novelizations for Target Books’ Doctor Who range, penning more than sixty of these books which helped to expand my vocabulary and excite my imagination – particularly in the days before blu-rays, DVDs or even VHS tapes.

Dicks’ punchy novels are often highlighted for their relative brevity, but his economy of style also showed a flair for vivid descriptiveness and a beautiful, dry wit, which never spoke down to its audience.

Dicks’ ideas and words helped to form the pages of my own creativity. For that and for so many adventures with the Doctor through space and time, I’ll always be grateful.

“No point in being a grown-up if you can’t be childish.” 
― Terrance Dicks, Doctor Who and the Giant Robot

Stranger Things – What To Watch Next

st3-production-still-4-1

Ante K. Lundberg guides you through a personal list of films that inspired and informed Stranger Things, plus some his own choices, just for fun. 

So you’ve finished the latest season of Stranger Things, and you’re looking to fill that hole in your heart it’s left you? Well, you’re not alone. As a child of the 1980s, I find myself in the middle of a resurgence of film, television, video games and music made by my generation that is inspired by the 80’s. And it’s beautiful.

I was born in 1985, the year of a certain summer in the town of Hawkins, as seen in Stranger Things 3. Notable cinema releases that year included true classics such as Back to the Future, The Breakfast Club, Day of the Dead, Weird Science – and many more.

As requested by the ancient editor of Out of Dave’s Head, I’ve gathered a list of recommended films for viewing if you, like me, just can’t get enough of the ‘80s love that is happening right now. Some of the films on here have inspired the Duffer Brothers in creating and writing Stranger Things, others are just perfect examples of wonderful ‘80s cinema. These are the real deal, friends, so put on your Walkman, rewind that tape, and let’s get to it!

Stand by Me, director Rob Reiner, 1986

A group of young friends discovering who they are, the meaning of friendship, and life lessons? Check. Walking along a railway? Check. Small town thugs terrorizing our teen heroes? Check. While set in the 1950s, Stand By Me is an ‘80s film through and through, with a cast including young Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, John Cusack and Kiefer Sutherland! Based on a novella (The Body) by legendary author Stephen King, Stand By Me is a genuine, grade A classic, full of character, fun and heart.

The Lost Boys, director Joel Schumacher, 1987

There’s hardly a more ‘80s-looking and sounding film than The Lost Boys. This is the whole package; the music, the costumes, the hair. It also has Tim Capello shaking his sweaty, muscular hips and saxophone, and a healthy dose of teenage vampires living forever, led by (there he is again) a young, menacing Kiefer Sutherland, the hilariously bad vampire hunters the Frog Brothers (featuring that other ‘80s Corey… Haim), and a cracking, fast pace. Trust me, you won’t be bored by this one.

Evil Dead 2: Dead By Dawn, director Sam Raimi, 1987

I’m not in any way saying you shouldn’t see the original Evil Dead, but the sequel not only (kinda sorta) recreated the first film in the intro, it went way beyond the original with a fantastic combination of fear, blood and laughs. If you’re looking for one of the most hilariously over-the-top splatter comedies out there, Evil Dead 2 simply set the bar. Bruce Campbell’s performance is one for the ages, with some of the most amazing physical comedy ever put on film. It’s not without reason his wonderfully awkward-yet-badass leading chin Ash Williams got more films and recently a series, Ash vs Evil Dead – which is also well worth a watch! In addition, fans of Stranger Things 3 will find the cabin-under-siege setting nicely familiar!

Aliens, director James Cameron, 1986

James Cameron has made two of the finest sequels ever in Aliens and Terminator 2 Judgment Day (and I haven’t even mentioned Stranger Things 3’s HUGE homage to The Terminator… oh wait, I just did). It’s common knowledge that in Aliens, the tight spaceship corridors first established in Ridley Scott’s masterpiece Alien are expanded to play host to some of the best action sequences put to film.

Aliens is a perfect mix made up of one part great production design, one part a superb cast of character actors playing a ragtag group of soldiers (including Bill Paxton and Michael Biehn – who would be a great addition to the Stranger Things cast!), one part body horror and huge parts action, all flavoured with a beautiful mother/adopted daughter relationship.

Add to that mix a scheming Paul Reiser (none other than Stranger Things 2’s Dr. Sam Owens), on great form as the company man more ruthless than the titular Aliens could ever hope to be, you’ll be hooked before you can say “game over”.

The Thing, director John Carpenter, 1982

I mean, really, John Carpenter in general, but in particular….

One of my favourite films is John Carpenter’s The Thing. Another claustrophobic body horror, set in an isolated location the characters can’t escape (see also Aliens, above), the mood in The Thing is unrivaled thanks to Carpenter’s direction and Rob Bottin’s incredible, practical animatronic work on the title creature.

Another great contribution from Carpenter, too often overlooked, is In the Mouth of Madness (1994 – yes, I’m cheating to include this, I know!), a horrifying Lovecraft-inspired film with lots of potential friends for Stranger Things’ Demogorgon.

In fact I would bet several films in Carpenter’s catalogue have inspired the Duffer Brothers in some way, as his body of work is chock-full of classics that I implore you to seek out and watch, including Escape from New York, Halloween, The Fog, Christine, Prince of Darkness and more.

Carpenter’s scores, often written and performed by the man himself, are also a huge inspiration for the Stranger Things soundtrack composers, Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein.

Pretty much everything John Hughes had a hand in during the 80’s

Yeah, you heard me. John Hughes had an incredibly creative output, and most of his stuff really is the beating pulse of ‘80s cinema. Writing and/or directing classics like The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Weird Science and Pretty in Pink, he leaves us quite the legacy of movies that nicely illustrate the trials and tribulations of the teen years.

Although time has not been perfectly kind to all these films (especially in the female characters department), the look and feel are true ‘80s, unbeatably so. I recommended starting with The Breakfast Club, where you will at least have seen the gif of a totally ’80s tough guy raising his fist victoriously in the air, from one of the film’s many classic moments. “Don’t you forget about me” indeed…

Day of the Dead, director George A. Romero, 1985

George A. Romero pretty much invented the modern zombie (sans the running) with his slow, lumbering packs of dread in Night of the Living Dead (1968), Dawn of the Dead (1978) and Day of the Dead. All three should be considered classics in their own right and can be watched separately or as part of a saga where – not really spoiler alert – things do not bode well for mankind.

In Day of the Dead, odds are not in our favour, as the zombies outnumber us and the remaining human population hide in shelters, trying to find a way to survive. Romero’s zombie films are part visceral horror, part social commentary (stop teasing the zombies, really!) and, as usual, it seems our biggest threat is each other. Day’s opening sequence also plays a big part in the opening episode of Stranger Things 3.

The Goonies, director Richard Donner, 1985

Personally, I’m not a big fan of The Goonies but it’s considered by many as an essential watch, and certainly is a Duffer Brothers touchstone for their Netflix show. If you’re after a “kids on a mission” film filled with adventure, treasure and danger, then look no further, and it features Sean Astin, Stranger Things’ lovable Bob, years before he was a Hobbit for Peter Jackson.

E.T. – The Extra-Terrestrial, director Steven Spielberg, 1982

Tonally, Stranger Things owes a lot to Steven Spielberg’s lovable ET. The little guy is stuck somewhere he doesn’t belong, and is just trying to get home, despite the government suits doing their best to stop him. Cue the brilliant and inventive 80’s kids (see an ongoing motif here?) doing their damndest with what they have by hand. The film also includes that legendary bike sequence, glaringly referenced in the first season of Stranger Things.

The Deadly Spawn, director Douglas MacKeown, 1983

A fabulous and fun creature feature starring young Charles George Hildenbrandt (the son of one of the Hildenbrandt Brothers, who painted the legendary fantasy-style poster for Star Wars in 1977, as well as the poster for this movie).

The plot concerns a crash-landed alien that finds refuge in the basement of a house and grows to monstrous proportions, and the plucky band of teenagers who do battle with it. The many ghastly teeth of the monster here sure do look a whole lot like the ghastly teeth of the Mind Flayer from Stranger Things 3.

Altered States, director Ken Russell, 1980

All Ken Russell films are worth your time, but Altered States, Russell’s adaptation of the Paddy Chayefsky novel, will particularly resonate with fans of Stranger Things 3, as it runs with the idea that sensory deprivation tanks (as used by Eleven in the show) can activate hidden parts of the brain. But boy, Russell takes things in a totally wild direction that will blow your mind.

Ghostbusters, director Ivan Reitman, 1984

I don’t really need to over-explain this one, right…!? Bill Murray, Dan Ackroyd, Sigourney Weaver, proton packs, bustin’ makes me feel good, Zuul! Stranger Things 2 crosses them streams.

A Nightmare on Elm Street, director Wes Craven, 1984

I can only imagine the feeling of seeing this particular nightmare in a cinema in the 80’s (Editor’s Note: It was pretty darn good!). The now iconic Freddy Krueger was an inescapable foe, terrorizing the dreams of poor teens with knives-for-fingers and a serious case of bad skin day.

I was late to the Elm Street party and, seeing it at an older age, I found myself really digging the over-the-top scenery chewing performance from Robert Englund as Freddy. Definitely worth a watch, even though “you’ll never sleep again!”

IT, 1990

I can’t really recommend Tommy Lee Wallace’s IT miniseries from 1990, which time hasn’t treated well. The acting is wooden (Tim Curry not included, he is great), the pacing is slow and the effects are completely outdated (Editor’s Note: this calls for fisticuffs in the pub later, Lundberg). But it does have the loser’s club camaraderie seen in Stranger Things and, I’m willing to bet, was a childhood watch for the Duffer Brothers.

Rather, DO give the book a read, even if it is a long one, or see Andy Muschietti’s new two-film version that is in turn set in the ’80s and inspired by the same palette as Stranger Things. You can watch the trailer for IT Chapter Two here.

Mullets, big-haired teens in pastel and neon clothes, muscle cars and BIG songs might have defined the decade, but the ‘80s have so much more going for them in terms of entertainment. And if Stranger Things has left you with a hankering to revisit those years, this list will be a good place to begin!

About the author

Ante K. Lundberg is a movie and music buff from the fjords of western Norway. Living with his wife and two small children, he longs for the day when he yet again will be able to binge watch a series.

He wrote this essay on a straight regime of pitch black coffee, Meteor and Gunship on vinyl, and several (imaginary) training montages.

Send In The Joker – New Trailer

joker-trailer

Just ahead of its premiere at the Venice Film Festival, here’s the final trailer for Todd Phillips’ Joker, starring Joaquin Phoenix.

What to make of this? It looks pretty intense and Phoenix is clearly pulling out all the stops, but frankly Phillips’ track record (The Hangover movies… oy!) causes a little pause for breath and despite the clearly well-intentioned decision to basically makes this a riff of Scorsese’s King Of Comedy I’m concerned it all feels a little too familiar, that its narrative arc may be a path already too well-trodden.

Frankly, I hope I’m wrong, I hope this film absolutely knocks it out of the park and I’ll be first in line on opening day, but I can’t help think this might not be a joke funny enough to repeat.

Joker opens on October 4th.

Bollywood And Beyond: Mission Mangal

mission mars

Welcome to Bollywood And Beyond, our new regular column looking at the incredible movies coming out of Bollywood and Indian cinema, with our host, Chris Conway.

Mission Mangal (translated as Mission Mars) tells the true story of the Indian Mars orbiter mission, that was successfully launched back in September, 2014. It’s not an action film or edge-of-seat drama, like Apollo 13, but like Ron Howard’s movie, it tells the audience a story we know has actually happened.

Initially announced in 2013 and going into production as the real-life Mars Orbiter was launched, the film’s story is loosely based on the lives of scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation and focuses on the largely female team and their driven mission director, who all made it happen against incredible odds.

Director Jagan Shakti (previously a second unit or assistant director on films including Dear Zindagi, Holiday and Thupakki) put together a very engaging cast: Akshay Kumar (one of Bollywood’s most prolific actors) is perfect as the slightly eccentric director, and among the female team is the always excellent Vidya Balan (from films including Lage Raho Munna Bhai) struggling to balance work with being a mom and wife. Sonakshi Sinha plays a smoking, serial dating propulsion expert, Tapsee Panu portrays a soldier’s wife and payload expert. Add a pregnant woman, a separated Muslim woman, a nerdy young guy and an elderly man (at 59?) – and that’s quite a team.

The main story follows the mission’s beginnings and the problems faced by the team along the way, allowing us to get to know and empathise with the characters. This is greatly helped with the inclusion of some gently funny scenes, highly enjoyable as Akshay and Vidya are such likeable actors.

It’s all been slightly romanticised, of course – several times a team member will find something from everyday life which is the solution to a problem, and the film doesn’t really do science – in fact the team always use simplified terms, even in mission control.

The film even slips a song or two in there, this is Bollywood, after all. You’d be disappointed if there were none (certainly Indian audiences would be).

Shakti (along with fellow writers R. Balki, Nidhi Singh Dharma and Saketh Kondiparthi) makes sure the story is big on Indian patriotism – and why not? It is the first Asian Mars mission (and the cheapest!) – but if you’re not in a hurry with the plot everything carries you along to a nice ending.

In fact, if you’re looking for a word to describe the film, “nice” would fit perfectly.


Chris Conway is a Bollywood enthusiast who sees at least twenty Bollywood films a year, often at Leicester’s Piccadilly Bollywood Cinema. He’s also a jazz pianist, vocalist, composer and songwriter who is currently celebrating his thirtieth year of recording and performing. He also loves cloudy days and J-pop.

The Skywalker Saga Ends – Rise of Skywalker Trailer

rise

Okay, moving swiftly over that lackluster poster released at the D23 expo this weekend, let’s cheer instead for the minute or so of new footage revealed in this “special look” at Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

..well, it certainly looks lovely, but there are a lot of folks out in internet-land worried that J J Abrams will not bring this nine film saga to anything remotely resembling a satisfying end. Of course it’s internet-land and that’s what internet-land folks do, but still, there’s some substance in those worries.

Love it or hate it, Rian Johnson took some intriguing chances with The Last Jedi (chances I mostly loved, by the way) and many feel that Abrams is more likely to play things safe, as he did with The Force Awakens.

We’ll all find out soon enough, as this final film in the Skywalker saga is due to hit our screens in December. Are you excited, scared or just plain bored? Sound off in the usual places for comments.

Game Of Thrones Comes To Marvel (And What That Could Mean For The Cinematic Universe)

kit-harington

There’s been a lot of news coming from Disney’s D23 expo this weekend, so let’s catch up on the fact that Game Of Thrones’ Kit Harington, better known as Jon Snow, is joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Harington will join his Game Of Thrones buddy, Richard Madden, in Chloé Zhao’s The Eternals, to play a character called Dane Whitman. This is intriguing for a whole bunch of reasons we’ll unpack here.

Dane Whitman, as all good comic book readers know, is the alter ego of the Black Knight, a character who wields a mystic ebony sword (with a blood curse) and a long-time member of The Avengers.

In more recent years, the Black Knight’s story was closely connected to Marvel’s UK superhero, Captain Britain, a character that the geek rumor mill has been in overdrive about for the past couple of years, suggesting that Marvel are gearing up to bring him to their Cinematic Universe.

While Whitman and the Black Knight have been connected to The Eternals in the comics (via a romantic entanglement between Whitman and Eternal, Sersi), you might begin to question why they’re being brought together for the movies, it seems unlikely someone with Harington’s star power would be brought in for a one-off cameo, and…

Well, that’s a lot of conjecture and putting two and two together to make five, but hey, what else can we do with so little solid information coming from Marvel at this early stage!?

Will this be a full-on introduction for the Black Knight? Will that lead to a Black Knight movie or series (Harington would fit in nicely with the other Disney Plus Marvel shows)? Will that open up a doorway to introduce Captain Britain? Will the UK cease to exist after Brexit?

Feel free to add your tuppence ha’penny worth’s of opinions in the comments below.

Meanwhile, the Game Of Thrones alumni will join Angelina Jolie, Kumail Nanjiani, Lauren Ridloff, Brian Tyree Henry, Salma Hayek, Lia McHugh, and Don Lee.

The Eternals will hit your local cinema next November.

Time To Get Excited About Star Wars Again – The Mandalorian Trailer Has Arrived

d23-the-mandalorian-poster-tall-A.jpg

The trailer for Jon Favreau’s new live-action Star Wars TV series, The Mandalorian, has arrived, and it looks amazing:

So much to unpack from this: bounty hunting in the Star Wars universe, movie quality special effects, a wonderfully gritty look and, yes, Werner Herzog. This thing looks crazy and crazy good. Even if you’ve found your enthusiasm for all things Star Wars waning in recent years, you have to admit there’s a weirdness to this that Lucas’s (and Disney’s) universe has been calling out for.

Creator, writer, and director Jon Favreau (that’s Happy Hogan to YOU, sir and Madam) has promised The Mandalorian will dig into the “darker, freakier” side of Star Wars and it doesn’t look like he was kidding.

Set after the fall of the Empire (in Return of the Jedi) and before the rise of the First Order (in The Force Awakens), the series stars Pedro Pascal (in the title role), Gina Carano, Nick Nolte (really!), Giancarlo Esposito, Emily Swallow, Carl Weathers, and Omid Abtahi. Yes, and Werner Herzog appears.

Disney have a lot of faith in this show, so much that they’ve already announced Season Two will begin shooting this autumn.

As noted in many other pieces here, because this autumn Disney will take over our viewing habits entirely, the new Disney Plus streaming service launches on November 12.

Ms. Marvel – Marvel’s First Muslim Superhero Comes To Disney Plus

ms marvel

New streaming service Disney Plus is developing a series based on Kamala Khan, AKA Ms. Marvel, Marvel Comics’ first Muslim super-hero, according to an exclusive report by The Hollywood Reporter.

Created by editors Sana Amanat and Stephen Wacker, writer G. Willow Wilson, and artists Adrian Alphona and Jamie McKelvie, Khan was Marvel’s first Muslim character to headline her own comic book, launched by the publisher in 2014.

In her comic book iteration, the current Ms. Marvel, Kamala Khan, is a teenage Pakistani-American from New Jersey with shapeshifting abilities who discovers that she has Inhuman genes, activated by a cloud of Terrigen mist, and assumes the mantle of Ms. Marvel from her idol Carol Danvers after Danvers becomes Captain Marvel. The series not only explores Khan’s conflicts with supervillains but also explores conflicts with Khan’s home and religious duties.

Marvel’s announcement that a Muslim character would headline a comic book was met with widespread reaction and the first volume of Ms. Marvel won the Hugo Award for best graphic story in 2015.

I’ve read the various volumes of Ms. Marvel as they’ve been released, and found them to be fresh, inventive, insightful and fun. While I may not be the comic’s target audience, I’ve come to fully appreciate what Marvel have done with the character.

According to THR, Marvel is developing a live-action series for the new streaming service, due to launch in November 2019, and they’ve hired British writer Bisha K. Ali to write and act as showrunner. Ali is a comedian, who was in the writer’s room for new Netflix comedy drama, Sex Education and is currently a staff writer on Hulu’s remake of Four Weddings and a Funeral.

The live-action Marvel shows already in development are The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, to debut in late 2020; WandaVision, to debut in spring 2021; Loki, also for early 2021; and Hawkeye, for late 2021.

Ms. Marvel has no production or transmission dates announced as yet, but be sure to stick with Out Of Dave’s Head for more information on this exciting news as we get it.