Ant-Man & The Wasp Trailer – Little Heroes, Big Fun

ant-man-and-the-wasp-1200x800

Considering its incredibly troubled production history (Edgar Wright and Joe Cornish bailing on Marvel due to those pesky creative differences after they’d completed huge amounts of work on the project) 2015’s Ant-Man turned out to be way more fun than it had any right to be.

Now the sequel, again helmed by Peyton Reed, looks set to continue in the same vein, if the newly released trailer is anything to go by.

Nicely picking up the story of Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) as left dangling in Captain America: Civil War, Ant Man & The Wasp now sees the diminutive (sometimes not-so-diminutive) hero partnered with, as the title suggests, Evangeline Lily’s Hope van Dyne, A.K.A. The Wasp.

The trailer is incredibly breezy and suggests the producers have retained the previous film’s smart move to keep things more (sorry) small scale.

Ant-Man & The Wasp opens July 6th, not long after the studio’s much anticipated double-punch of Black Panther, followed by Avengers: Infinity War.

Advertisements

There’s Something Happening Here – The Handmaid’s Tale Season 2 Trailer

handmaid

If you haven’t yet caught Hulu’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, starring the brilliant Elisabeth Moss, you’ve missed out on one of the finest TV dramas of 2017.

Now would be a good time to catch up with this harrowing story, as Hulu have dropped the trailer for the second season and announced an airdate of April 25th.

This timely series takes place in a brutal, dystopian future of gender politics and the new season steps into new territory as it expands the storyline past Atwood’s novel. Thankfully, the author is very much involved and if season two is even half as good as the original then the TV landscape for 2018 will be shaping up very nicely.

Meanwhile, here’s the trailer to whet your appetite…

Franco’s Film Is No Disaster – The Disaster Artist

the-disaster-artist-f72066

When talking about James Franco’s The Disaster Artist it’s probably best to get the elephant in the room (no pun intended) out of the way first.

Franco has had a number of troubling accusations leveled against him, and while trial by social media is a dangerous arena you’re going to have to put them aside if you want to enjoy this film as it’s the Franco show all the way.

Still with me? Okay, well this recent news is made all the more sad and frustrating because Franco has made one hell of a film. Telling the story of the unlikely friendship of Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero, and their even unlikelier journey to making one of the truly great cult movies of all time, The Room.

If you’ve ever seen that remarkable creation, or have knowledge of the bizarre circumstances of the film’s production, you’ll understand that it would have been all too easy to make The Disaster Artist from a position of sneering at its subject. Instead, Franco and co have crafted something which not only gets as close to finding the man beneath the enigma that is Wiseau (who lies about both his age and background) as we’re ever likely to get, but does so with a surprising amount of heart and frailty. More importantly we’re allowed to see the sheer force of will it took Wiseau to self-finance and write, produce, direct and star in his own movie. Fans of The Room will not be disappointed at the lovingly recreated sections of that most bizarre of movies (and stick around until the end of the credits for a typically gonzo appearance from Wiseau himself).

Anybody who has ever attempted an act of creativity will empathise with Wiseau and marvel at the true story of something that became derided but loved by millions of moviegoers. Much like Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, this is a film about the outsider and one which celebrates and exalts that position.

It’s possible Franco is about to get firsthand experience of being a Hollywood outsider, and if the allegations against him are proved true then that will be deservedly so, but until we know more I’m going to judge the film on its own merits, and this is a warts-and-all look at a true individual and is one of the most enjoyable movies I’ve seen in a long time. Highly recommended.