Let Them Fight! Godzilla: King Of The Monsters Promises Monster Mash-Up!

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Alongside the reveal of the awesome new poster, “Let them fight!” seems to be the message from the brand second trailer for Godzilla: King of the Monsters as it promises one almighty monster mash-up.

The film has quite the impressive cast on new and returning actors, including Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga, Millie Bobby Brown, Bradley Whitford, Sally Hawkins, Charles Dance, Thomas Middleditch, O’Shea Jackson Jr., Ken Watanabe, and Zhang Ziyi.

Several of these good people will obviously survive their encounter with the big guy this time and will be returning for the already-in-production Godzilla vs Kong, which is due to stomp everything in its path on on May 22, 2020.

Meanwhile, the King of the Monsters gets ready to do battle with Mothra, Rodan and King Ghidorah on May 31, 2019. Get ready to rumble…

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Godzilla: King Of The Monsters Trailer Is Badass!

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Before we go any further, here’s your trailer for Godzilla: King of the Monsters. Let’s meet back here straight after…

Well, what can I say? Rodan, Mothra, King Ghidorah… mankind as a virus and the last titans of Earth the only way to save us? Yep, that looks batshit crazy and I’m completely down with it.

There’s a lot of nuts looking stuff in here and it looks like the film will fully embrace the monsterverse Legendary Pictures have long been promising. With the promise of appearances from even more Toho monsters than revealed here, plus the reintroduction of the classic Godzilla theme music, this film just keeps looking better all the time.

Michael Dougherty’s Godzilla: King of the Monsters opens May 31st, 2019 and I’ll be holding my radioactive breath until then.

Stranger Things Calling Godzilla

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Stranger Things’ Millie Bobby Brown stars in what is likely to be the first of several new teasers for Godzilla: King of the Monsters, attempting to make contact with Monarch. Here it is for your viewing pleasure:

Monarch is the shadowy agency seen in Gareth Edwards’ 2014 Godzilla and Jordan Vogt-Roberts’ 2017 Kong: Skull Island, and if you were patient enough to stay through the end credits of the latter film you’ll have seen the reveal of an element tying the two films together, one which will presumably be expanded upon in Michael Dougherty’s forthcoming sequel to both.

As regular readers of this site will know, your intrepid writer is a major Godzilla geek, so you can be sure I’ll be bringing you all the news on King of the Monsters as it arrives.

UPDATE: Legendary Pictures removed the video from their YouTube account, so I’ve re-uploaded from another source. View it while you can, I guess, dear readers…

Godzilla: King Of The Monsters Blasts Free!

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Go-go, Godzilla! Japan’s mightiest monster blasts free in a new image revealed exclusively by Entertainment Weekly today.

We’re big fans of all things Godzilla in these parts, and have held our own in many geek arguments about Gareth Edwards’ 2014 take on the beast. Incoming director Michael Dougherty’s forthcoming sequel, Godzilla: King of the Monsters, promises even more excitement as the Legendary Pictures Monsterverse introduces Rodan, Mothra and King Ghidorah.

Long-time fans of the original Japanese series of films will know these variously as Godzilla’s allies and enemies and the prospect of these creatures doing battle in a big budget Hollywood film is utterly delicious.

Dougherty has produced some interesting work (particularly 2007’s Trick ‘R’ Treat) and his new story sees the creatures under some kind of human control.

The very intriguing cast is led by  Vera Farmiga, Ken Watanabe, Sally Hawkins, Kyle Chandler, Millie Bobby Brown and Zhang Ziyi, it scheduled to be released on May 31, 2019 in 2D, 3D, and select IMAX theaters.

Bring on the monsters and let them fight, I say…

Godzilla R.I.P. – Sayonara, Haruo Nakajima

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Haruo Nakajima (中島 春雄 Nakajima Haruo) the Japanese suitmation actor best known for portraying Godzilla from the original movie in 1954 through twelve consecuctive films until Godzilla vs Gigan in 1972, has passed away at the age of 88.

Alongside his physically demanding role as the King of the Monsters, he performed suitmation roles as monsters in an unprecedented number of kaiju eiga including Rodan (1956), Mogera in The Mysterians (1957), Varan the Unbelievable (1958), Mothra (1960), Matango (1963), Baragon in Frankenstein Conquers the World (1965), Gaira in War of the Gargantuas (1966) and even the Eighth Wonder of the World himself, King Kong in King Kong Escapes (1967). He would also work with Godzilla special effects genius Eiji Tsuburaya in a number of the popular Ultraman TV series.

Nakajima’s impressive career began at the age of 33 in Sword for Hire (1952), before taking on roles in The Woman Who Touched the Legs (1952), Eagle of the Pacific (1953) and Farewell Rabaul (1954) – both for original Godzilla director Ishirō Honda, which led directly to his casting as the beloved monster – and then Seven Samurai for Akira Kurosawa in 1954.

After his retirement from film and television work in 1973, Nakajima would become a popular and much loved figure at many Godzilla conventions around the world.

In the short film The Man Who Was Godzilla, Nakajima said: “In the end the Godzilla I played remains on film forever. It remains in people’s memory, and for that I feel really grateful.”

Rest in peace, Godzilla.

Godzilla: King Of The Anime

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Care of Godzilla expert August Ragone’s always authoritative website, The Good, The Bad, and Godzilla, news comes that Toho Animation have just dropped the first teaser trailer for their forthcoming anime, Godzilla: Monster Planet (international title: Godzilla: Planet of the Monsters).

With a screenplay by Gen Urobuchi, writer of animated TV series including Peulla Magi Madoka Magica and Kamen Rider Gaim, and directed by Koubun Shizuno (Knights of Sidonia) and Hiroyuki Seshita (Ajin: The Demi-Human) the film, the first in a trilogy, will premiere in Japan in November, while Netflix have picked it up for international worldwide distribution.

Executive producer, Yoshihiro Furusawa, was reported in Variety as saying “I wasn’t familiar with Godzilla, and I made the film so even those who don’t know Godzilla can enjoy watching it.”

The story is set in the future world of 2048 and centres on a group of human beings who take revenge after being pushed from Earth by monsters such as Godzilla.

Here’s hoping for an animated Godzilla that will banish thoughts of Godzooky from the collective consciousness once and for all.

Shin Godzilla. Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes!

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Warning: Here be spoilers.

When Toho announced in 2014 that we would be getting a new Godzilla film and it would be co-directed by Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi, with a screenplay by Anno and visual effects by Higuchi, it was a certainty that the men who collaborated on the anime, Neon Genesis Evangelion, would be giving us a very different kind of Godzilla.

And so, jump forward to 2016, and that’s exactly what we have. Shin Godzilla, or Godzilla Resurgence as it’s also known, takes a markedly different approach which will either be seen by viewers as a refreshing stroke of genius or as a huge disappointment.

I fall squarely in the former opinion. The human viewpoint in this film is not on some forced love affair, or crazed scientist caught up in the events of a giant monster stomping through Tokyo, but rather it takes a long, hard look at the stuff we usually don’t see: the politicians, the military, the administration and the bureaucracy thrown into complete turmoil by the emergence of a creature in Tokyo bay that comes up onto land and works its way through the city relentlessly.

That this creature is only the first stage in the development leading to the newest form of Godzilla is just one of the new slants taken by Anno & Higuchi. It’s a strange looking beast, almost comical, which serves to keep viewers on loose footing as we’re then shown how much damage it creates on a very personal level.

And that’s another interesting wrinkle, there are no central lead characters (despite the lead billing of Hiroki Hasegawa, Yutaka Takenouchi, and Satomi Ishihara (whose struggles with her English line readings unfortunately shine through all too clearly). Instead, we follow a bureaucratic hive mind of politicians and scientists as they struggle to figure out evacuation plans to minimise the public death toll.

When the final Godzilla emerges again to wreak havoc, the stakes get higher as the U.S. threatens to intervene with nuclear weapons, a course still found abominable by the Japanese, of course. The politicians become caught between a rock and a hard place as they must decide whether to bow to international pressure or strike forward with their own plan.

I found this approach completely refreshing and was absorbed quickly into proceedings. Drawing inspiration from (and heavily alluding to) the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami gave this film a resonating power that really sets it apart from and yet beautifully parallels Ishiro Honda’s nuclear parable in 1954’s original, Godzilla. Anno and Higuchi are highly critical of the bureaucracy that frequently mires Japanese officials into inaction, but they also express positivity and hope of Japan finding its way without international intervention (something I feel has been misread in some quarters as out and out nationalism). Having said this, I can see why this very talky approach will not appeal to all viewers – there are a lot of scenes in board rooms and meeting rooms. Your mileage may vary.

The action when it comes is spectacular. Seeing Godzilla attack the military with an entire bridge is something that filled me with complete joy, and despite one or two shaky FX shots, this is a hugely impressive film visually, with many breathtaking shots. I also loved Godzilla’s astonishingly brutal new radioactive breath, and the newest additions to his arsenal.

The design of this new Godzilla has also proven to be controversial among Godzilla fans (but then change of any kind is always controversial among Godzilla fans). His slow movements and little arms (and biiiig thighs) do take a little getting used to, but I warmed to both approaches by the end.

Without going into full spoiler mode, the final shot is also quite horrifying and chilling (something I’ve not felt in a Godzilla film since Honda’s original) and if a sequel moves ahead – highly likely since this is now the highest grossing live-action Japanese film of 2016 and the highest grossing Japanese-produced Godzilla film in the franchise – then it would prove an intriguing starting point for any new story.

One of the qualities I love best about the Godzilla franchise is its constant ability to reinvent itself – it’s done so many times before and with Godzilla being a worldwide brand thanks to the continued success of the Japanese films and international offshoots such as Gareth Edwards’ 2012 U.S. production – and what I enjoyed about Shin Godzilla is that the big, scaly beast has mutated into something different once again. Don’t like it? Don’t worry, there’ll be yet another type of Godzilla along in twenty or thirty years. Right now, I’m happy with this horrific new incarnation.

Look out! It’s the new Godzilla Resurgence trailer!


One of Japan’s biggest exports (probably falling somewhere behind motor vehicles and sushi) is Godzilla, and I’m very excited about the prospect of a brand new movie featuring the grumpy, radioactive monster.

The first Toho production of their most bankable star since 2004’s Godzilla: Final Wars, Godzilla Resurgence will trample through Japanese cinemas on July 29, helmed by filmmakers Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi (known for their work on Neon Genesis Evangelion and the live-action Attack on Titan). Anno also wrote the screenplay for the film, while Higuchi oversaw the special effects.

While little is currently known about the storyline, it’s a fairly safe bet that there will be a huge amount of property damage, the Japanese army will waste vast amounts of ammunition and Godzilla is unlikely to tell any jokes.

Higuchi has previously revealed they will utilize CG technology for the film, calling their monster the “most terrifying” version of Godzilla to date.

Toho have just released a second trailer for the film (see above) through their YouTube channel and it looks massively impressive, with some wonderfully atmospheric shots of the big guy (and a lot of very worried looking people in a variety of offices), set against a suitably portentous score by Shiro Sagisu.

Having just returned from a trip to Tokyo, it’s clear that Toho are really getting behind this latest production, as there is a veritable avalanche of Godzilla promotions and merchandise available everywhere, from department stores to restaurants to art galleries.

As much as I enjoyed Gareth Edwards’ 2014 movie, I can’t wait to see Godzilla stomping through his old neighbourhood, as Japan gets ready to crumble!

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