“This Never Happened To The Other Feller.” No Time To Die Review



Time weighs heavily on James Bond in Daniel Craig’s final outing.

No Time To Die, the 25th film in the beloved James Bond franchise, had quite the tortuous road to cinemas, as reported in several posts here on Out Of Dave’s Head: the hiring and departure of director and writer Danny Boyle and John Hodge, replaced by Cary Joji Fukunaga and long-time Bond scribes Neil Purvis and Robert Wade (with the later addition of Phoebe Waller-Bridge), and then the little matter of a worldwide pandemic, saw Bond 25 shift from it’s original release date of November 2019 several times until it’s eventual release this week.

So it’s pleasing to report that the finished production shows little of the troubled path taken by its long development. No Time To Die is a fine addition to the long-running series, and a superb send-off for the Daniel Craig era.

Opening with the first ever flashback sequence seen in a Bond film, the first indication of time’s conceptual importance here and the closest Bond has ever come to horror, the story then shifts to pick up almost where the previous entry, Spectre, left off: with Bond and Léa Seydoux’s Madeleine Swann driving off into the sunset for a life of bliss. But fate (and the scriptwriters) have other plans for the couple as both of their pasts catch up with them in a fantastic action sequence through the streets of Maltera, Italy.

Five years later and Bond and Swann are in very different places, but the past refuses to die, bringing together a plot to eradicate large portions of the population of the world, with many of the characters who have featured in Craig’s Bond’s narrative, from Casino Royale onwards.

The film is not without its faults, the twin villain strands detract from each other, leaving Rami Malek’s terrorist Lyutsifer Safin curiously underdeveloped, the editing often feels like sequences have been cut too short (particularly affecting Malek’s character in the climax), and Lashana Lynch’s much heralded new 007, Nomi, is something of a characterless let-down and a creative dead end.

But No Time To Die is excitingly directed by Fukungawa, with some genuinely breathtaking sequences and it all moves at a great pace (despite a little wavering in the middle third). The film’s secret weapon, Ana de Armas, is a delight and a joy, playing against the character’s initial impression to become one of the highlights in a sequence set in Cuba that manages to be both a throwback to the classic Bond elements of charm and style while simultaneously updating those elements with humour and panache. The campaign for her character, Paloma, to get her own spin-off movie, officially starts here!

Everything leads towards an ending which, though somewhat messy in execution, has a huge emotional pay-off, something that hasn’t really been achieved in a Bond film since On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, in 1969. It’s a massively bold choice for Bond and one for which the makers should be applauded. To say I was in tears would be an understatement.

Mention of George Lazenby’s only outing as Ian Fleming’s character is entirely appropriate, as that film is quite deliberately echoed both in one of the film’s thematic conceits and indeed in reprising John Barry’s song, We Have All The Time In The World. Long time Bond fans will appreciate the callback and newbies will immediately recognise the weight it gives to No Time To Die‘s story.

Craig’s Tom Ford boots are going to be difficult to fill, as both he and the producers caught the zeitgeist, with Craig playing against the archetype to make Bond a deeper, richer and more human character. His unconventionally handsome, rock-face features and pugnacious interpretation of Bond will be greatly missed. But his time in the role has been rightly celebrated in his imperfect but courageous final outing, proving that the Bond franchise still has the ability to surprise, after all this time.

Following the film’s emotional denouement, it was indeed something of a relief, for those of us who stayed in the cinema to watch the credits roll, to read the familiar final caption: James Bond Will Return.





No Time To Die – Billie Eilish Music Video.


The music video has been released for Billie Eilish singing the theme song from the forthcoming 25th entry in the James Bond franchise, No Time To Die.



While the song was originally released back in February, the official music video has been held back until now, due to the film’s Covid-19 related delay.

Now, with the film hitting cinemas in just a few short weeks (you can view the latest trailer here), we can see Eilish being sultry all over clips from the film, highlighting the troubled relationship between Bond and Dr. Madeleine Swann.

No Time To Die, Daniel Craig’s final outing in the tailored Tom Ford suits as 007, directed by Cary Joi Fukunaga from a screenplay by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Fukunaga and Phoebe Waller-Bridge, with a score by Hans Zimmer, and co-starring Léa Seydoux, Jeffrey Wright, Christoph Waltz, Lashana Lynch and Rami Malek, will be with us on 12 November (in the UK and Australia) and the 20th November (for the USA).

Bond Is Back – No Time To Die Trailer

no time to die 2

Hey, anyone interested in seeing the trailer for the new James Bond film, No Time To Die?
‘thought so…

 

There’s a lot riding on this, as not only is it Daniel Craig’s fifth and final outing as 007 (like, 99.99999999% probably), but after the critical drubbing handed out to the previous film, Spectre, fans are hoping that Craig will bow out on a high note for the long-running series.

Director Cary Fukunaga, infamously replacing Trainspotting’s Danny Boyle – who bowed out after disagreeing with producers on the direction of the script – also has a lot on his plate with this. He’s had a pretty acclaimed run as director up to this point (True Detective season one, Beasts Of No Nation, etc), so he’ll be hoping this won’t be The Spy Who Killed Him.

It’s an interesting one even further behind the scenes too, as it will be the first Bond film distributed internationally by Universal Pictures, following the expiration of Columbia Pictures’ contract after Spectre. I’m sure the studio will be crossing their fingers for a successful debut.

So, y’know, no pressure on this being a Bond barnstormer.  That being said, this trailer seriously kicks all the ass; it looks beautiful, the action (of course) looks amazing and there’s even the strong suggestion of a great storyline.

No Time To Die also stars Ralph Fiennes, Naomie Harris, Ben Whishaw, Rory Kinnear, Jeffrey Wright and Léa Seydoux reprising their roles from previous films, along with newcomers Rami Malek, Ana de Armas, Lashana Lynch, David Dencik, Dali Benssalah and Billy Magnussen. And yes, as revealed here, Christoph Waltz is returning as Blofeld.

The film is currently scheduled for theatrical release on 2 April 2020 in the United Kingdom and on 8 April in the United States.

And Bond 25’s Title Is…

oo7

…Shatterhand?

Yeah, I get that’s a little click-baity, but this comes from a piece in industry resource, Production Weekly.

The title is already well-known to 007 fans, as the name Dr. Shatterhand appeared as an alias for Bond’s nemesis, Ernst Stavro Blofeld in Ian Fleming’s You Only Live Twice  novel.

If the title is correct, and it’s been floating around the top of the Bond 25 rumour mill for quite a while, it throws open many questions including: will Blofeld return? If so, who will he be played by? Traditionally, Blofeld has been portrayed by a different actor (including Donald Pleasance, Telly Savalas and Charles Gray) on every appearance, but would Christophe Waltz be tempted back?

This possible confirmation comes hot on the heels of the news that the film’s release date has been pushed back to April 2020, due to extensive script rewrites. Bourne Ultimatum writer Scott Z Burns will be taking a pass at the screenplay for Daniel Craig’s fifth and final outing as 007. This in itself is probably good news, given the film’s many delays at the begining of production, with original director Danny Boyle backing off, to be replaced by Cary Joji Fukunaga.

Fukunaga has previously announced he expects Bond 25 to pick up on threads from SPECTRE, lending relevance to the meaning behind that possible title.

Craig will be reuniting with Lea Seydoux, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Whishaw, and Naomie Harris, and we’ll be sure to bring you more Bond news as it drops.

Bond 25 Gets True Detective Helmer

cory

In a surprise but very welcome piece of news, EON Productions announced today that Cary Joji Fukunaga will helm the much-troubled Bond 25.

I don’t recall seeing Fukunaga crop up on many of the speculative “who will replace Danny Boyle?” lists circulating a few weeks ago, but this is great news. Fukunaga – the first American to direct a Bond film – was one of the driving forces behind the highly-praised first season of True Detective ( for which he won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series), as well as the 2015 Netflix movie Beasts of No Nation, on which he was writer, director, producer, and cinematographer.

“We are delighted to be working with Cary. His versatility and innovation make him an excellent choice for our next James Bond adventure,” said Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, while probably breathing huge sighs of relief. At least until Fukunaga also walks off the project in a few weeks, of course. Hey, stranger things have happened on Bond 25, right…!?

More news as it comes on Dave Bautista taking over as Bond when Daniel Craig leaves midway through filming. Probably.